Loading...

Carriers still have too many dead zones where e911 services will simply not work. For public safety reasons the FCC should be mandating that carriers address this issue first and require them to have more transparency. Deadcellzones.com has a database of over 100,000+ locations where cell phone users could be compromised in an emergency.

AT&T's cellular towers track the position of callers either by using tower triangulation or by using the phone's internal GPS, enabling the network to report the caller's current position to the "Public Safety Answering Point" where 911 operators handle calls. If the cell phone users has no signal than this method simply does not work. Here is an example map that Southern Link Wireless has kindly provided that should be required from all carriers down to the street level:

in reference to:
"AT&T's cellular call towers track the position of callers either by using tower triangulation or by using the phone's internal GPS, enabling the network to report the caller's current position to the "Public Safety Answering Point" where 911 operators handle calls."
- AppleInsider | AT&T: 3G MicroCell rollout advancing, held up by E911 rules (view on Google Sidewiki)

Submitting your cell phone coverage complaints to your carrier just got even easier with Deadcellzones.com. No longer do you need to spend time on hold talking to customer service and submitting information that goes into a black hole. Now you can Tweet your cell phone coverage complaints using the hashtag #deadzones. Search for recent #deadzones Tweets here.

Be sure to include some or all of the following: carrier, city, intersection and if its a dropped call, congestion or complete dead zone location. Submit cell phone coverage complaints for AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, T-Mobile, MetroPCS, Leap and US Cellular. Our community of users around the U.S. will help you submit your coverage complaints to the pin map at Deadcellzones.com.
in reference to: DeadCellZones.com (DeadZones) on Twitter (view on Google Sidewiki)

Millions of U.S. cell phone users could have seamless home coverage if they could simply use Wi-Fi VoIP services from Skype or Google Voice. More than 50% of cell phone users who have wifi in their home also are unable to get a strong cell phone signal throughout their entire home. Please explain why in 2009 I still can't use a VOIP service on my iPhone or Android?

Google has published a blog post responding to AT&T's complaints. The gist: A) Google Voice is a free application and therefore not required to follow common-carrier rules or basically listen to the FCC at all; B) it's not a replacement for traditional phone service such as that offered by AT&T; and C) it's still in private beta.

Wireless carriers fundamentally do not like Google, Yahoo, Facebook, Myspace or even the tiniest blogger either. They see all these Internet companies coming to the playground and taking their marbles away. Carriers would like to charge you for every single thing that traverses the Internet, each individual email, every IM, every Facebook post, every Twitter post, literally everything. This is precisely why we need net neutrality and why it is important for the FCC to keep the lines drawn between the telephone common carriers and the Internet.

in reference to: City Brights: Yobie Benjamin : Why AT&T is full of it and why Google Voice is good for the consumer (view on Google Sidewiki)

There really is no explanation for why Charlotte, NC was chosen as the test city for their new femtocells. We have thousands of cell coverage complaints for AT&T in our database Deadcellzones.com and Charlotte has less than 100 complaints currently. The West Coast should be AT&T's primary concern with the hilly terrain, zoning issues, heavy iPhone users and poor cell phone tower build out. Stay tuned as this battle has only begun.
in reference to: AT&T Wireless Cell Phone Coverage Map (view on Google Sidewiki)

Subscribe for Email Updates